Future Collars is entering the Czech and Slovak markets by offering dedicated programming courses.

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Team Future Collars
Future Collars, a renowned digital competence school, continues its expansion into the European market by introducing its programming courses to the Czech Republic and Slovakia. This strategic move confirms the school's position as an educational partner for leading technology companies. Both countries, being dynamically developing technological hubs, fit perfectly into Future Collars' development strategy.
Future Collars is entering the Czech and Slovak markets

We are in the Czech Republic We are in Slovakia

Since June, Czech and Slovak students have had the opportunity to take advantage of online courses with the support of practitioners offered by Future Collars. The boot camps take place live, and participants gain practical skills in addition to theoretical knowledge, helping them develop professionally.

As part of the cooperation in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, Future Collars offers boot camps aimed at both beginners and those already on an IT career path. The program includes informational and advisory support, including group workshops and English language recruitment support, as well as a specialized IT Talent Profile aptitude test. The courses also include elements of artificial intelligence, allowing participants to acquire not only basic programming knowledge but also AI-related skills that are increasingly in demand in the job market.

The Czech and Slovak technological scene is dominated by the development of mobile applications, e-commerce solutions, fintech, and artificial intelligence, indicating its dynamic growth and predicting a huge demand for highly skilled IT professionals. The increase in the number of startups, IT companies, and software development centers opens up new employment opportunities for IT specialists. Beata Jarosz, CEO of Future Collars, comments, "Our reskilling and upskilling offerings address the key challenges of accessing IT specialists and help companies and employees reach their full potential. That's why we are proud to play a significant role in enhancing skills and career transitions in the Czech and Slovak markets. Additionally, IT specialists working in the Czech IT market are the best paid in Central and Eastern Europe, making Future Collars' courses even more attractive to those looking to transition and find jobs in the IT industry," adds B. Jarosz.

 

Czech Republic - IT market potential and the need for qualified specialists

Prague and Brno, the two largest cities in the Czech Republic, are major technological centers known for their dynamic ecosystems and attractive locations for foreign investments. They have strong positions in fields such as artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, and bioinformatics.

Furthermore, companies such as Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, SAP, Red Hat, Honeywell, Siemens, Cisco, Accenture, and Deloitte have their headquarters or representations in the Czech Republic. The presence of these companies indicates the growing attractiveness of the Czech market for the technology sector, which is developing at a rapid pace. And as the number of startups, IT companies, and software development centers grows, new employment opportunities for IT specialists arise.

However, this market is struggling with a shortage of qualified workers. The introduction of our courses to the Czech market will not only allow us to meet the growing demand for IT specialists but also provide high-quality training that will help participants acquire competitive skills and advance their careers in the IT industry. Additionally, our courses have been enriched with elements of artificial intelligence (AI), enabling participants to gain not only basic programming knowledge but also AI-related skills that are increasingly sought after in the job market, comments Joanna Pruszyńska-Witkowska, Vice President of Future Collars.

Slovakia - growing technology sector and demand for IT specialists

Slovakia, like the Czech Republic, is experiencing dynamic growth in the technology sector. Companies such as IBM, Dell, AT&T, Accenture, Infosys, Siemens, SAP, and Microsoft also have their headquarters or representations in the Slovak market. Additionally, Bratislava and Kosice are home to many technology parks and startup incubators. These cities have significant potential in fields such as artificial intelligence, e-commerce, software for the banking and insurance sectors.

"We know that as the Slovak technology sector develops, the demand for IT specialists with various skills is enormous. By offering programming courses to Slovaks, we enable them to acquire practical skills and knowledge needed in the job market. Students who complete our courses will be well-prepared to pursue careers in the IT industry and meet the growing demand for specialists," adds Beata Jarosz, CEO of Future Collars.

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Future Collars is a leading digital competence school specializing in reskilling and upskilling employees. The school offers online courses in programming and software testing, providing practical skills and job placement support.
More information about Future Collars' offerings can be found on their website: https://futurecollars.com/en

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